Video that BC Soccer Recruits Receive…

This Is Boston College Women’s Soccer

Boston College Women’s Soccer. This is the video that is sent to Boston College’s Women’s Soccer committed recruits to give them a little insight into what makes BC soccer unique. It’s what being a girl on a team is all about… family, friendships, pride loyalty and trust.

p.s. To learn more about How To Coach Girls, check out Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. It’s available for purchase here. Continue reading “Video that BC Soccer Recruits Receive…”

How to keep girls in the game after puberty

From CNN:

How to keep girls in the game after puberty

“Seven out of the 10 girls who quit sports during puberty said they didn’t feel like they belonged in sports, according to the survey of more than 1,000 girls ages 16 to 24. Nearly the same number (67%) said they felt that society doesn’t encourage girls to play sports.

Hoping to change those numbers and keep more girls in the game, Always has come out with the latest installment in its viral #LikeAGirl campaign:

Nearly seven out of 10 girls in the Always survey said there are not enough female role models in sports today. Continue reading “How to keep girls in the game after puberty”

How Lack of Female Coaches Affects Kids

From The Atlantic:

The Field Where Men Still Call the ShotsThe Field Where Men Still Call the Shots

The lack of female coaches in youth sports can make lasting impressions on boys and girls.

“When you only see men in positions of power, you conclude ‘sports are not for me.’”

“Much attention and worry has been devoted to the decline of female coaches at the collegiate level since Title IX was passed in 1972. This landmark legislation prohibited discrimination on the basis of sex in all educational programs that receive federal funds, and its passage compelled colleges to ramp up the number of athletic teams for girls to stay on par with what they offered boys.

While nudging a record number of girls into athletics, Title IX also contributed to an unexpected and steady drop in the number of female collegiate coaches of women’s teams, from 90 percent in 1972 to 43 percent in 2014. In response to Title IX, many colleges combined male and female athletic departments, which in turn often meant that men now oversaw women’s teams; the law also meant pay parity for women’s-team coaches, the now-lucrative salaries attracting male coaches to female sports. These phenomena, among others, pushed women out of college coaching.”

More generally, girls who see just males in charge of teams may develop the distorted belief that leadership roles are reserved for men—and that aspiring to lead means adopting a masculine style of governance.

Read entire article here.

Continue reading “How Lack of Female Coaches Affects Kids”

AYSO Adopts Silent Saturday Policy

AYSO Adopts Silent Saturday Policy

From AYSO58:

AYSO Adopts Silent Saturday Policy

What is Silent Saturday?

“Silent Saturday” has been instituted in AYSO Regions throughout the country finding a great deal of success. Its main purpose is to just let the kids play and have fun without having to worry about how their performance is affecting the adults on the sidelines. “Silent Saturday” is a throwback to the old schoolyard days when kids would get together after school and on weekends just to play the sport all day without regard to who was winning and repercussions for poor play and decision-making.

The objectives of holding a “Silent Saturday” are:

• To reemphasize that the game is about letting the kids play and have fun.

• To give the players a chance to play totally on their own.

• To eliminate the verbal questioning of the referees’ decisions.

• To help the few parents and coaches who feel they must provide constant direction to understand that the kids can play very well on their own with limited instruction.

While the vast majority of adult verbal participation is intended to be positive and constructive, the fact of the matter is that games can (and have in the past) become so loud that the players often have difficulty hearing each other on the field. Taking one week off from any verbal interference may help adults’ gain perspective on just how loud they’ve been in the past. Continue reading “AYSO Adopts Silent Saturday Policy”

Ainslee Lamb on Coaching Her Daughter

On coaching her daughter Brooklyn:

Thank you so much Ainslee Lamb for your support of  HOW TO COACH GIRLS:

It is refreshing to read HOW TO COACH GIRLS that recognizes and embraces the unique aspect of coaching female athletes. A guide for coaches of all sports to facilitate the incredible responsibility and privilege we have to work with the future female leaders through the wonderful gift of sport.

To finally articulate the sentiments of many successful female sports team coaches, and identify the techniques and approaches that will contribute to the potential success of the girls both on and off the fields.

To demonstrate to all of us that adjusting our approach, focus or style of communication is no longer a compromise but the sign of a great coach that only wants to catapult these girls to be confident, capable and proud young women today! HOW TO COACH GIRLS gives us tangible ideas, practice plans and thought provoking chapters to help us do exactly that!

Continue reading “Ainslee Lamb on Coaching Her Daughter”

How To Coach Girls at South Shore Select #LikeAGirl

Alison Foley running practice at South Shore Select club soccer. Our thanks to Zoe Lee for creating this video.

Thank you also to Liz Lima for her support of How To Coach Girls:

The lessons learned from sports can help shape a girl for the rest of her life.  HOW TO COACH GIRLS teaches you about the very real and positive impact that sports can have on young girls and best practices to help empower the next generation of strong and confident females.   #likeagirl

Liz Lima

Director of AP Programs at club soccer team South Shore Select

Continue reading “How To Coach Girls at South Shore Select #LikeAGirl”

Cover Reveal of HOW TO COACH GIRLS & Two Free Chapter Giveaway!

We are thrilled to reveal the cover of How To Coach Girls!

Volunteer parents and experienced coaches alike will find invaluable advice on creating a successful team that motivates girls to stay in sports beyond the middle school years. Twenty-two chapters cover major issues, including how to pick captains, the importance of growth mindset, issues around body image and puberty, as well as the challenges of coaching your own daughter.

In addition, fifteen professional coaches from a range of sports, including former Olympian athletes, give their advice on what girls need from a coach to allow them to flourish in sports, and most importantly, have fun.

2 Chapter GIVEAWAY of How To Coach Girls

We am giving away two chapters of How To Coach Girls. You can download it here.

Continue reading “Cover Reveal of HOW TO COACH GIRLS & Two Free Chapter Giveaway!”

Fabian (Fabe) Ardila – Volleyball

Fabian (Fabe) Ardila, Volleyball Coach

Fabian (Fabe) Ardila

Fabian (Fabe) Ardila has coached volleyball for close to thirty years starting when he was eighteen years old. He coached high school volleyball for both boys and girls including Newton South, Wellesley, Sacred Heart, and Weston High Schools. He was the assistant coach for Harvard University as well. He currently also coaches at the club level for Smash Volleyball, as well as at his own club, MGA. For the U.S.A. Women’s National Volleyball Team, Fabe was a coach for the setters who competed at the Rio Olympics under Coach Karch Kiraly. He is currently working U.S.A. Volleyball with high performance athletes who train for future Olympics, including the national teams. Last, but certainly not least, he coached his three daughters who all play at a high level.

  Fabian (Fabe) Ardila, Volleyball Coach

On Coaching Your Own Daughters

I think listening is a key component when coaching your own daughters. We don’t do a good job at listening both on the parent side, and as their parent/coach. We don’t really listen and understand when our kids tell us what is going on and what difficulties they are having. We just assume that they should be doing things a certain way. If we listened a little better, and had better communication between the player (who is your son or daughter), and the coach, I think that would go a long way. It’s interesting because I’ve coached all three of my daughters, and each one had a different personality. But I believe the success that we had with each one of them had to do with talking in a way that each one understood what I was trying to get out of them, and pushing them just enough so that I wasn’t alienating them from me being a dad, or from our team and the things we wanted to do as a team.

For more advice from Fabe including how he gets his players to love the game, please read How To Coach Girls coming out March of 2018.

p.s. To learn more about How To Coach Girls, check out Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. It’s available for purchase here.

How To Coach Girls Alison Foley Mia Wenjen coaching book for girls


Kelly Doton: Women’s Field Hockey

Kelly Doton

Kelly Doton
Boston College

Head Coach Women’s Field Hockey

Doton became head coach of the Boston College field hockey program in 2015. She started as associate head coach at Boston College in 2012, and previously coached at Indiana University.

In Doton’s four seasons, Boston College has posted double-digit wins each year and has advanced to the NCAA Tournament in each of the last three seasons (2013-2015).

A 2004 graduate of Wake Forest, Doton was an asset to the Demon Deacons on both sides of the ball during her collegiate career, helping to lead her squad to back-to-back NCAA championships. 

In addition to being named the ACC Player of the Year in 2002, she was also a two-time NFHCA First-Team All-American and a three-time All-ACC honoree during her career.

In addition to her collegiate playing experience, Doton was a member of the U.S. Women’s Senior National Team from 2005-10. In 2008, she was part of the U.S. squad that traveled to the Summer Olympics in Beijing, China.

Kelly Doton 

What is your best piece of advice to a girls youth coach? 

Honesty is the best coaching approach. Criticism is never easy to hear and some young female coaches have a tendency to sugar coat coaching when it comes to things players can improve on. I hear a lot of youth coaches who acknowledge and congratulate athletes for things that shouldn’t be commended. In my opinion, that is validating bad play as acceptable. It’s the blue-ribbon society we live in where kids are getting a trophy just for playing. Be fair, be honest, and be open to the players. Treat your number 1 player on your depth chart just the same as the one sitting in last place.

 

For Kelly Doton’s team building exercise for selecting team captains, please read How to Coach Girls coming out March of 2018.

p.s. To learn more about How To Coach Girls, check out Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. It’s available for purchase here.

How To Coach Girls Alison Foley Mia Wenjen coaching book for girls


Sarah Dacey – Soccer

Sarah Dacey Soccer

Sarah Dacey

Women’s Soccer Head Coach

Barry University

Sarah Dacey joined Barry University as Head Coach in 2016 after spending the previous season as an Assistant Coach under Denise Brolly. Previously, Dacey was the head coach at Babson College, as well as club head with the FC Bolts and Pinecrest Premier Soccer Club. She served as an assistant coach at the University of Albany, Boston College, Providence College, and the University of Tennessee. As an assistant at Boston College, she helped lead the Eagles to the 2010 Women’s College Cup.

Dacey played professionally for the WUSA’s Carolina Courage and Boston Breakers until 2003, when she took over as head girls’ soccer coach at the Fay School in Southborough, Mass.

A four-year letterwinner and three-year starter under legendary coach Anson Dorrance at UNC, Dacey helped lead the Tar Heels’ soccer program to three National Championships while earning Honorable Mention All-American honors in 1996. The Tar Heels went an amazing 98-3-1 during her career. She was also a three-year member and two-time All-American selection in women’s lacrosse, leading the Tar Heels all the way to the Final Four on two occasions.

Sarah Dacey Soccer

Best advice To a New Coach

I would say don’t under estimate how competitive girls can be and how much they want to learn. I found that the more competitive I would make practice, the more enjoyable and the more intense and invested the players would be. Girls love to compete. Communication is also very important. Girls are people pleasers by nature so they want to feel like they are doing right by their coaches and they want to work hard. Positive reinforcement and encouragement are essential. At the end of the day, the players want to have “fun” but as coaches it is our responsibility to still teach the game the right way. There is no reason why coaches can’t make sessions enjoyable where the players are learning at the same time. Finding that balance is key.

For Sarah Dacey’s team building game called “Zimbabwe,” please read How To Coach Girls coming out March 2018.

p.s. To learn more about How To Coach Girls, check out Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. It’s available for purchase here.

How To Coach Girls Alison Foley Mia Wenjen coaching book for girls