AYSO Adopts Silent Saturday Policy

AYSO Adopts Silent Saturday Policy

From AYSO58:

AYSO Adopts Silent Saturday Policy

What is Silent Saturday?

“Silent Saturday” has been instituted in AYSO Regions throughout the country finding a great deal of success. Its main purpose is to just let the kids play and have fun without having to worry about how their performance is affecting the adults on the sidelines. “Silent Saturday” is a throwback to the old schoolyard days when kids would get together after school and on weekends just to play the sport all day without regard to who was winning and repercussions for poor play and decision-making.

The objectives of holding a “Silent Saturday” are:

• To reemphasize that the game is about letting the kids play and have fun.

• To give the players a chance to play totally on their own.

• To eliminate the verbal questioning of the referees’ decisions.

• To help the few parents and coaches who feel they must provide constant direction to understand that the kids can play very well on their own with limited instruction.

While the vast majority of adult verbal participation is intended to be positive and constructive, the fact of the matter is that games can (and have in the past) become so loud that the players often have difficulty hearing each other on the field. Taking one week off from any verbal interference may help adults’ gain perspective on just how loud they’ve been in the past.

Kids have the right to play soccer without having to hear:

“Wake up! Don’t just stand there!”

“You have GOT to be kidding me!”

“Watch the game, ref, you might enjoy it.”

”GO TO THE BALL.”

Parents…. Coaches…. just let the kids play and have fun!

RULES FOR SILENT SATURDAY

Spectators

Please be advised that you may not make any verbal comments on the game or direct any comments to the players, referees or coaches – on or off the field. Clapping IS allowed! Be creative in how you choose to cheer your child’s team – make signs to hold up, bring a rally towel in the team’s color and wave it wildly, there are lots of ways to cheer other than verbally.

Coaches

You may not provide any direction – verbal or non-verbal – to players who are on the field. You make speak quietly to any players that are on the bench, but DO NOT give those players instructions to yell out to their teammates! Coaches may address the players at a normal tone before and after the game, during water breaks and during halftime. 6U, 7U, and 8U coaches will still referee their games, but we ask that you do so quietly and with minimal instruction to players on the field.

Players

You are encouraged to speak to each other on the field. You are free to support each other and provide direction to each other. Players on the bench may cheer freely in a positive manner, but may not provide instruction to those on the field.

Referees

Referees have been instructed that if spectators and coaches are not following the rules, the referees are to stop the game and issue a warning. The referee will then have the option to give a second warning if the behavior continues, to remove coaches or spectators who are not cooperating, or to terminate the game.

Let’s always encourage and support our players while they are learning and playing the game, but for this one Saturday, “Mums the Word!”

Ainslee Lamb on Coaching Her Daughter

On coaching her daughter Brooklyn:

Thank you so much Ainslee Lamb for your support of  HOW TO COACH GIRLS:

It is refreshing to read HOW TO COACH GIRLS that recognizes and embraces the unique aspect of coaching female athletes. A guide for coaches of all sports to facilitate the incredible responsibility and privilege we have to work with the future female leaders through the wonderful gift of sport.

To finally articulate the sentiments of many successful female sports team coaches, and identify the techniques and approaches that will contribute to the potential success of the girls both on and off the fields.

To demonstrate to all of us that adjusting our approach, focus or style of communication is no longer a compromise but the sign of a great coach that only wants to catapult these girls to be confident, capable and proud young women today! HOW TO COACH GIRLS gives us tangible ideas, practice plans and thought provoking chapters to help us do exactly that!

 

Ainslee Lamb was head coach of the Yale University field hockey team from 1999 to 2003. In 2005, she became head coach of Boston College, where she coached for 10 years. Under her lead, the Eagles recorded a winning record and have received many accolades. At the end of the 2014–15 season, Lamb resigned her position as head coach. She is currently coaching Natick Middle School girls field hockey as well as coaching various national teams for the USA Field Hockey program including U17, U19 and U21.

A 1994 graduate of the University of Toronto, Lamb was a three-year field hockey letter winner, helped lead the team to a national championship in 1988 and earned All-Canadian honors three times.

Prior to college, Lamb was a member of both the 1990 World Cup team and Canadian National team from 1987-92, where she competed in the Junior World Cup, the Olympic qualifying tournament and two Four Nation Tournaments.

Ainslee Lamb
Vice President of Field Hockey
College Connection
3 STEP Sports, LLC

How To Coach Girls at South Shore Select #LikeAGirl

Alison Foley running practice at South Shore Select club soccer. Our thanks to Zoe Lee for creating this video.

Thank you also to Liz Lima for her support of How To Coach Girls:

The lessons learned from sports can help shape a girl for the rest of her life.  HOW TO COACH GIRLS teaches you about the very real and positive impact that sports can have on young girls and best practices to help empower the next generation of strong and confident females.   #likeagirl
Liz Lima
Director of AP Programs at club soccer team South Shore Select

Cover Reveal of HOW TO COACH GIRLS & Two Free Chapter Giveaway!

We are thrilled to reveal the cover of How To Coach Girls!

Volunteer parents and experienced coaches alike will find invaluable advice on creating a successful team that motivates girls to stay in sports beyond the middle school years. Twenty-two chapters cover major issues, including how to pick captains, the importance of growth mindset, issues around body image and puberty, as well as the challenges of coaching your own daughter.

In addition, fifteen professional coaches from a range of sports, including former Olympian athletes, give their advice on what girls need from a coach to allow them to flourish in sports, and most importantly, have fun.

2 Chapter GIVEAWAY of How To Coach Girls

We am giving away two chapters of How To Coach Girls. You can download it here.

 

Pre-Order HOW TO COACH GIRLS

How To Coach Girls comes out March 1, 2018, but it’s available for pre-order HERE! Thank you so much for your support!

To learn more, please check out How To Coach Girls websiteInstagramTwitter, and Facebook.