Sarah Dacey – Soccer

Sarah Dacey Soccer

Sarah Dacey

Women’s Soccer Head Coach

Barry University

Sarah Dacey joined Barry University as Head Coach in 2016 after spending the previous season as an Assistant Coach under Denise Brolly. Previously, Dacey was the head coach at Babson College, as well as club head with the FC Bolts and Pinecrest Premier Soccer Club. She served as an assistant coach at the University of Albany, Boston College, Providence College, and the University of Tennessee. As an assistant at Boston College, she helped lead the Eagles to the 2010 Women’s College Cup.

Dacey played professionally for the WUSA’s Carolina Courage and Boston Breakers until 2003, when she took over as head girls’ soccer coach at the Fay School in Southborough, Mass.

A four-year letterwinner and three-year starter under legendary coach Anson Dorrance at UNC, Dacey helped lead the Tar Heels’ soccer program to three National Championships while earning Honorable Mention All-American honors in 1996. The Tar Heels went an amazing 98-3-1 during her career. She was also a three-year member and two-time All-American selection in women’s lacrosse, leading the Tar Heels all the way to the Final Four on two occasions.

Sarah Dacey Soccer

Best advice To a New Coach

I would say don’t under estimate how competitive girls can be and how much they want to learn. I found that the more competitive I would make practice, the more enjoyable and the more intense and invested the players would be. Girls love to compete. Communication is also very important. Girls are people pleasers by nature so they want to feel like they are doing right by their coaches and they want to work hard. Positive reinforcement and encouragement are essential. At the end of the day, the players want to have “fun” but as coaches it is our responsibility to still teach the game the right way. There is no reason why coaches can’t make sessions enjoyable where the players are learning at the same time. Finding that balance is key.

For Sarah Dacey’s team building game called “Zimbabwe,” please read How To Coach Girls coming out March 2018.

Mary-Frances Monroe – Soccer

Mary-Frances Monroe Soccer

Mary-Frances Monroe

Women’s Soccer Head Coach

University of Miami

Mary-Frances Monroe has been the head soccer coach at University of Miami since 2016, after seven years as the head coach of the University of Albany. A well-respected player and instructor, Monroe competed on the field with the Boston Breakers of the WPSL Elite League as recently as the 2012 season.

Charged with building the Great Danes program from the ground up, Monroe and her coaching staff won 2009 America East Co-Coaching Staff of the Year honors in just her fourth year at the helm. During that season, the Great Danes earned the first Division I postseason berth in program history.

Just one year later in 2010, the Great Danes finished with a 10-8-2 record under Monroe’s direction – the first winning season for the program since 1988.

A four-year college All-American at the University of Connecticut and UCLA, Monroe was a candidate for the Hermann Trophy, awarded to the best female college soccer player in the country. As a freshman with the Huskies, the Northport, N.Y., native set the program’s single-season record with 65 points. Monroe was rewarded for her spectacular debut with BIG EAST Rookie of the Year honors and first-team all-conference recognition.

Monroe also achieved success on the international level as a player, earning several caps with the United States Women’s National Team.

Mary-Frances Monroe Soccer

 

What is your best piece of advice to a girls youth coach?

Be honest and communicate. Communication is so important at all levels. It is so important to be positive when a player does something well.

Understand your players. Some players may need more positive reinforcement than others. Sometimes those players may even need you to say “great pass” even if it was a 15 yard pass completed under pressure. Make sure you understand that isn’t praising a player for making a mistake. This is helping a player build confidence.

There are also times that you need to be hard/demanding on a player. They want to know what they are doing wrong and how to fix it. Just yelling at a player telling them what they already know doesn’t help a player develop. These kids are human and will make mistakes, but they need to understand that at the next level making continuous mistakes may cause them limited playing time.

I tell my players I am their biggest fan but I am hard and I am demanding. I want to help develop them into the best player that they can be and help them follow their goals and dreams and the goals of the team.

Another piece of advice is to hold them accountable. You may have a super star that thinks they can get away with anything because they are “good” and/or the “best player on the team”. I have coached players that are the best on the team but their body language is poor when they make a mistake. I pull them over and explain to them they need to set a better example for the team. How do you think your teammates will feel if I let you get away with your poor body language. Think about someone who doesn’t play a lot and I continue to play you even though you don’t follow our rule of having good body language. This has been a great lesson for players like that. For this particular player, I understood as a coach she was just upset with herself but her team make not see it that way.

For Mary-Frances Monroe’s team building exercise, please read How To Coach Girls coming out March of 2018.