HOW TO COACH GIRLS Book Trailer

HOW TO COACH GIRLS Book Trailer

HOW TO COACH GIRLS by Mia Wenjen & Alison Foley

Did you know that 70% of all kids quit organized sports by the age of 13, with girls quitting at 6x the rate of boys?

Alison Foley, Boston College’s Women’s Head Soccer Coach, and Mia Wenjen, parenting blogger at PragmaticMom.com, help coaches — both parent volunteer and professional — crack the code of how to keep girls in sports. Continue reading “HOW TO COACH GIRLS Book Trailer”

Coaches: Focus on What Went RIGHT!

Focus on What Went RIGHT instead of What Went WRONG!

NAYS.org has a great article on focusing on the positive:

Focus on What Went RIGHT instead of What Went WRONG!

Dr. Sheriece Sadberry, sports psychologist: “Instead of focusing on what went wrong during the game, parents should focus on all the things their young athlete did right and things that they can improve on.”

We agree! Ainslee Lamb, a contributing coach for HOW TO COACH GIRLS talks about asking the team what went right.

What Should Be In Your Team Medical Kit?

Free Downloadable Emergency Medical Kit Check Off Form

We hope that we thought of everything because things can go wrong at sports practices and games. Here’s our checklist for the supplies to treat medical emergencies.

You can download our free form here.

Free Downloadable Emergency Medical Kit Check Off Form

How to Coach Girls is available through Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, and Audrey Press.

If anyone wishes to buy books for their town team or club team, Audrey Press offers volume discounts.

Review from Catherine Reid:

Great to see female coaches, who are still not the norm coaching girls and passing on trade secrets from years of experience to the community. This book is so poignant given the unique challenges of women and girls in sports. As a pediatric occupational therapist and former competitive soccer player, I appreciate message of enjoying the process of setting goals and striving to meet them while also recognizing the importance of coping with disappointing outcomes or celebrating success in a way that will inspire others around them. The framework of Growth Mindset, emphasizing practice and resilience, rather than constantly striving for perfection, is so relevant in the development of the whole person and combating the social phenomena of increased anxiety in the youth population. Congratulations to the authors for putting together this definitive handbook on how to coach girls!

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Coaches’ Check Off List to Get Ready for Fall Season

How to Coach Girls Pre Season Logistics Check Off Downloadable Form

Part of the HOW TO COACH GIRLS book is devoted to helping coaches avoid pitfalls as well as making it easier for them to succeed coaching girls.

We created a Pre-Season Logistics check off list and it’s free and downable here.

We hope this helps your fall season go smoothly!

How to Coach Girls Pre Season Logistics Check Off Downloadable Form

How to Coach Girls is available through Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, and Audrey Press.

If anyone wishes to buy books for their town team or club team, Audrey Press offers volume discounts.

 

Review from Ms. Yingling:

“This short but very complete volume addresses a wide variety of issues of coaching but emphasizes the need for coaches to recognize the special concerns of girls in sports. Since middle school girls are particularly vulnerable to quitting sports they love because of social pressures, this is a much needed book! The section on “The Big Picture” covers topics such as developing team chemistry, making sure that players are good teammates, and developing the whole athlete so that children are not just good at their game, but good people as well. These are all very important aspects of the cross country program with which I help, so it was good to reinforce that material, but the information about “keeping it fun” which includes CAKE was good to read as well. With 75 runners, the “fun” aspects has proven to be harder and harder to maintain, but it’s such a crucial element.

The section on solutions to specific issues is something that would have been useful to me when I was coaching my own daughter! Many coaches do this, and it’s hard to understand why methods that work with other athletes might not work with one’s own child! Cliques, confidence, captains, losing streaks, and the all important topic of body image are covered in just enough detail to inform beginning coaches of these pitfalls while offering helpful advice for seasoned coaches who might not have been able to come up with a good approach to some of them. (You have to break large teams into smaller groups, and we always agonize about it!)

After working with a seasoned coach for ten years, we have a good pre-season plan (it often feels like it’s a year-round plan!), but new coaches will definitely want to make sure that they pay special attention to the codes of contact and especially the medical emergency plans. (I’ve never thought about back up contact lenses, but then it’s pretty easy to run without corrective lenses, judging from my own experiences of running without them and the number of glasses I hold onto every season!)

The book itself is a great small size to through in a coach’s backpack, although since I am used to reading middle grade literature, the print seemed awfully tiny. This is a great resource for anyone coaching girls, and Girls of the Run should definitely buy these in bulk and hand them out with their resource boxes for this program! It also makes a great gift for the coaches in your daughters’ lives– combined with some chocolate, just for the “fun” factor!”

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To invest in girls, get them into sports

To invest in girls, get them into sports

The Vancouver Sun has an article that spoke to us:

Ravi Kahlon: To invest in girls, get them into sports

To invest in girls, get them into sports

Image: GERRY KAHRMANN / PNG

“Research shows that although boys and girls have the same innate physical abilities and start out equally active, girls’ athletic skills start falling behind after the age of seven. This gap only increases with age.

Only eight percent of girls are getting enough physical activity, compared to 14 percent of boys.

If girls haven’t participated in sports by the time they are 10 years old, there is only a 10-per-cent chance they will do so later in life. Moreover, by the time girls turn 13, they start dropping out of sports and other regular physical activities at twice the rate of boys.

Besides building strength and endurance, physical activity improves thinking and learning, emotional regulation and self-control, stress management, self-esteem, self-worth, resilience, and the ability to cope with anxiety and depression. Kids who engage in regular physical activity are more socially connected, successful, and less likely to use drugs than their inactive peers.

Girls who don’t participate in regular sports activities don’t get these benefits — which can limit their ability to reach their full potential.

Lessons learned on the sports field — such as teamwork, goal-setting, time management — transfer well to the boardroom and other career pursuits. Women who stay involved in sports often thrive in all aspects of life.

The challenge is encouraging more girls to get involved in sports when they are young and stay active — particularly during the critical teen years.”

 

Ravi Kahlon, a two-time Olympian in field hockey, and was elected Delta North MLA in 2017. He is parliamentary secretary for sport and multiculturalism.

 

How to Coach Girls is available through Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, and Audrey Press.

If anyone wishes to buy books for their town team or club team, Audrey Press offers volume discounts.

Review by Carolyn Wilhelm:

Whether you are a parent or teacher coach, this book would be a welcome addition to your library as it has a wealth of information, wisdom, and experience that will enhance any coaching experience. If you wish someone could sit down with you and share what really works, doesn’t work, and why in coaching girls, read this book for such advice. The authors state that 70% of all kids quit organized sports by the age of 13, with girls quitting at six times the rate of boys? This is certainly true in my experience. Team sports help children develop friendships, learn cooperation skills, have increased fitness, and understand expectations. It is wonderful when coaches offer their time to help students develop in these ways.

Chapters include such topics as keeping it fun, promoting a growth mindset, and developing good people (not just good players). The focus is on the overall development of the person (girl) and not only athletic skill level. There are solutions to specific issues such as when coaching your own daughter and handling a losing streak. Body image is another important topic covered. There are specific “code of conduct” lists for players and parents. Having parents sign a contract is a proactive method of preventing specific issues that could arise. This book has it all!

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Alison Foley Chosen as Top 50 Influencers by New England Soccer Journal!

2018 College Coaches Influences from New England Soccer Journal

Congratulations to Alison Foley, chosen as one of fifty top influencers by New England Soccer Journal:

Alison Foley Top 50 Influences New England Soccer Journal

ALISON FOLEY

 Women’s head coach | Boston College

Foley’s imprint is all over soccer in New England, far beyond bringing Boston College’s women’s team to 14 NCAA berths. She’s the senior director of coaching for South Shore Select, runs the Lady Eagles Soccer School and serves on the Region 1 ODP staff. Beyond her soccer duties, Foley recently coauthored a book called “How to Coach Girls.”

2018 College Coaches Influences from New England Soccer Journal

How to Coach Girls is available through Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, and Audrey Press.

If anyone wishes to buy books for their town team or club team, Audrey Press offers volume discounts.

Recent reviews include:

Debra Foley

A great book for coaches and parents. The author has a deep understanding of female athletes of all ages. I am very glad I bought it!!!

 

Julie Wilbur

Great book! If you coach any sport it is a good read, especially if you coach girls. Some helpful coaching tips too.

 

Todd J Flanagan

Got this book for father’s day. My teen daughter was leafing through it, read a few parts, and said, “I should give this to all my coaches.” Great stuff.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Acacia Walker-Weinstein is 2018 BC Interruption Coach of the Year Winner

Acacia Walker-Weinstein is the 2018 BC Interruption Coach of the Year Winner

Congratulations to Acacia Walker-Weinstein! She’s featured in HOW TO COACH GIRLS!

Acacia Walker-Weinstein is the 2018 BC Interruption Coach of the Year Winner

image Chris Bergmann-USA TODAY Sports

“Walker had led the Eagles to 2 straight NCAA Championship games, and this year helped coach Sam Apuzzo into becoming the first ever Tewaaraton Award winner from BC. This season, she also helped BC to stay undefeated in the regular season, with the team’s only losses coming in the ACC Championship and the NCAA Finals.”

To read more, please visit BC Interruption.

 

How to Coach Girls is available through Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, and Audrey Press.

If anyone wishes to buy books for their town team or club team, Audrey Press offers volume discounts.

Review by Gayle H. Swift

How to Coach Girls is a concise and practical guide that outlines an effective way to coach girls written by Allison Foley (head coach of Boston College Women’s Soccer) and Mia Wenjen (volunteer coach and soccer mom.) Decades of experience coupled with expertise gleaned from fifteen professional coaches provide a solid foundation for the strategies they endorse. Coaches from all types of sports can use them to connect with the girls on their teams.

As we all know sports can help teach invaluable lessons about effort, persistence, discipline and, team effort. It can and should also teach girls to be inclusive, considerate and dedicated. Wenjen and Foley warn against an over-emphasis on winning and cite data that supports their assertion that most girls participate in sports to have fun, friendship, and physical activity. (Winning is actually a minor motivator.)They recognize that sport must be fun for participants so that they will stay with it.

Team success can best be measured by the quality of experiences team membership creates and the values it reinforces. How to Coach Girls shares specific techniques for coaches along with the rationale which underpins them. Marketing plans, ideas for making drills fun and, a season-wide overview help coaches set the stage for long-term success. Wenjen and Foley recognize that coaches, parents, and girls must work hand in glove to create a positive athletic experience for girls.

Coaching girls through the lens of relationship and a “growth mindset” are excellent ways to accomplish that. Operating from this approach means coaches can help girls win at life and in their chosen sports. That is a win/win which we can all support.
–Gayle H. Swift, author of ABC, Adoption & Me, Co-founder of GIFT Family Services

I received an advanced reader copy in exchange for an unbiased review.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Win HOW TO COACH GIRLS book and swag!

Win How To Coach Girls book and swag

We are giving away How to Coach Girls book and swag pack!

To enter, please fill out the Rafflecopter at the bottom.

Win How To Coach Girls book and swag

a Rafflecopter giveaway

How to Coach Girls is available at Amazon, Barnes & Nobles, and Audrey Press.

If anyone wishes to buy books for their town team or club team, Audrey Press offers volume discounts.

Recent reviews include:

Frank J. Kelly:

Great little book – just nails it in terms of content – no fluff. If you are a coach of Girls you should read this and if you are a male coach of girls read this twice. It teaches quickly what it took me several seasons to learn on my coaching journey – first as parent, then team parent, then assistant coach and now coach of a Girls U12 recreation soccer team.

Key lessons
– Girls will compete after they bond – and so you need to give them opportunities to bond e.g. early in practice or make a water break take a little longer
– Break up any cliques that form
– Keep it fun
– Lots of positive reinforcement but make it genuine
– You have to build trust and safety – they won’t try or take risks if the feeling is that failure means punishment. You need to create “emotional safety”.

Lots of fun ideas e.g.
– Coaches’ forfeit
– Cupcakes for birthdays
– The “How to be a better teammate” game.

This is a quick read but should be handed out to every Girls’ team coach Day 1.

More reviews from Amazon:

I’m pretty sure I’m holding the new bible for coaching girls’ sports. I love this book because it’s as if the authors are inside the heads of the girls, revealing insights as to what will be most supportive for them as athletes and as human beings. I wish I could’ve had an extra copy or two of this resource on hand over the past several years as I watched my daughters grapple with issues on the soccer field. Would’ve saved a lot of heartache on the sidelines. I particularly liked the frameworks for how best to manage team dynamics, increase internal motivation, and tips for getting back on track when things become unsteady. I also loved the chapters on dealing with cliques as well as body image issues, some timely and relevant. Glad I found this book–great practical suggestions.

As a professional music teacher and mother of both a boy and a girl, I highly recommend this book. Many aspects, such as “Growth Mindset” and “Positive Reinforcement” can be applied to any sport or even how to coach kids to prepare for music competitions. My daughter has played in various levels of AYSO teams and two California Club teams, with some coaches who were great at coaching girls, and some who did not understand the difference in coaching boys and girls. This book should be required reading for all coaches, as it will help coaches to build player confidence, stronger team chemistry, and ultimately, the girls will choose to stay and develop with this team and in the sport. Bravo to Mia and Alison for this timely coaching guidebook for parents and coaches!

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

 

World Cup: How Did Belgium Get So Good?

World Cup: How Did Belgium Get So Good?

The Training Ground reveals how Belgium got so good at soccer.

Coaching revolution that took Belgium to top of world

World Cup: How Did Belgium Get So Good?

WINNING DOESN’T MATTER

“We don’t have league tables until the Under-14 level. That was one of the big battles for us. Coaches shouldn’t be concerned about tables and trying to win trophies before this age – they should be thinking about developing players.

Coaches are inclined to focus on winning the game. That makes them play the big, strong players who give them the best chance of winning, so the late developers end up on the bench 75% of the time.

The second thing we did was play four quarters. At the end of the first and third quarters all the subs had to come off the bench. That was the only time the coach could make substitutions. Otherwise they don’t develop, because they’re on the bench watching the game instead of participating in it.

Remember that slogan again – love the game, then the learning can start.”

 

We’re in Soccer Girl Problems: GIRLS, CONFIDENCE AND GIVING FEEDBACK

Soccer Girls Problems and How To Coach Girls

Thanks for hosting us Soccer Girl Problems!

GIRLS, CONFIDENCE AND GIVING FEEDBACK

Is it surprising that girls and women regularly underestimate their abilities and intelligence? It’s the opposite for boys and men who often overestimate theirs.

Katelyn Cooper, a doctoral candidate at Arizona State University, and her team asked 250 undergraduate biology students about their intelligence as compared to their peers.

“I would ask students about how their classes were going and I noticed a trend,” Cooper said. “Over and over again, women would tell me that they were afraid that other students thought that they were ‘stupid.’ I never heard this from the men in those same biology classes, so I wanted to study it.”

She found that men are 3.2 times more likely than women to believe they are smarter. On average, a man has a 61% chance of believing he is smarter than his colleagues, while a woman has only a 33% chance.

This confidence disparity by gender is not just true for biology students. Girls (and women) also underestimate their abilities across the board from academics to the workplace to sports. And, also notable, is that boys (and men) are the complete opposite, often believing that they are better than they actually are.

Read the rest here.

Continue reading “We’re in Soccer Girl Problems: GIRLS, CONFIDENCE AND GIVING FEEDBACK”

When Girls Keep Quitting a Team

Thank you for your tweets Jared Fritz! His daughter’s high school coach’s coaching style resulted in losing 10 teammates. He tweeted to us:

From my daughter “I feel that the coaches do not really care about making people feel wanted” As a dad, how do I encourage her to still play?

We wondered if the coach was overwhelmed? Perhaps the coach needed an assistant coach or a parent team manager? Also, we wondered if his daughter had friends on the team and that would motivate her to stay on the team.

Has friends on the team. Coach has an assistant. Likely needs help with relating and motivating to HS Girls. Has been explained his philosophy chasing kids away. Mine another in a long line

Unfortunately, the coach simply seems to have a philosophy of weeding out players. We responded that if the coach seems the attrition as an issue and is concerned, then our book might help. If not, our advice would be to go above to his boss to point out the problem.

His most recent tweet makes us so happy!